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PHARMING

e-mail phishing exampleLike phishing a pharming also involves collecting 'log in' data and other identifying elements of the user. In contrast to phishing however, this form of fraud does not take place by means of the forwarding of a fraudulent e-mail to the user (see the section relating to phishing for more information).
Pharming involves exploiting a technical procedure which makes a server other than the real one correspond to the address of the website required.
Once you have reached this site, which is often an apparently identical copy of the original, the user will be invited to input their data which will be collated and used fraudulently.
You may think it is impossible to discover that this is an act of fraud but really this is not so: any serious website which carries out financial transactions must use forms of code and protection and Carige reassures you in this connection.
The browser, when entering the website, must show an icon in the form of the closed padlock indicative of a "protected" connection, in the lower right or left-hand corner, depending on the type and version of browser used.
If this padlock is not present, beware, close the page and nothing will happen. Be careful, the presence of the padlock is not the only guarantee of the page's reliability, click here to understand how to check that the page can be trusted.
It is also important to check that the content of the website's protection certificate (accessible by clicking on the padlock) corresponds to that effectively issued by the certification body which guarantees the security of the transactions, in our case Verisign.

 

How to check the reliability of the website and the internet banking service page

 

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